top of page
  • Tyler Zuccarelli

How Residential Inpatient Rehab Differs From Other Forms of Treatment

Residential inpatient treatment and other forms of rehab are both important options for individuals seeking help for substance abuse, mental health, or behavioral issues.


However, there are some key differences between these approaches that can make one option more suitable for a given individual than the other. In this article, we'll take a closer look at the differences between residential inpatient treatment and other forms of rehab, including outpatient treatment, partial hospitalization, and intensive outpatient treatment.


residential inpatient rehab
Source: LA Valley Recovery

What Is Residential Inpatient Treatment?


Residential inpatient treatment is a type of rehab that involves living at a treatment center for an extended period of time, typically 30 to 90 days. During this time, individuals receive around-the-clock care and support from a team of professionals, including therapists, counselors, and medical staff. Residential inpatient treatment focuses on providing a structured, supportive environment where individuals can work on their recovery goals and build the skills and coping mechanisms they need to maintain long-term sobriety.


One of the main advantages of residential inpatient treatment is the program's intensity. Because individuals are living at the treatment center, they can fully immerse themselves in their recovery journey and receive a high level of support and guidance from their treatment team. This can be especially helpful for individuals with severe substance abuse problems, co-occurring mental health disorders, or a history of relapse.


Another advantage of residential inpatient treatment is the sense of community and camaraderie that can develop among individuals in the program. Because everyone is living and going through treatment together, forming strong, supportive relationships with others in recovery can be easier. These relationships can be an important source of support and encouragement during recovery.



However, residential inpatient treatment is not right for everyone. For one thing, it can be quite costly, as individuals must pay for their housing, meals, and treatment while they are in the program. Additionally, because it requires a significant time commitment, it may not be a practical option for those who have responsibilities such as work or family commitments that they cannot leave for an extended period of time.


Outpatient treatment is another option for individuals seeking help for substance abuse, mental health, or behavioral issues. Unlike residential inpatient treatment, outpatient treatment does not require individuals to live at the treatment center. Instead, they come to the treatment center for regular sessions with a therapist or counselor and are free to go home in between sessions. Outpatient treatment can occur at various levels of intensity, from once-weekly sessions to several sessions per week.


One of the main advantages of outpatient treatment is that it is more flexible than residential inpatient treatment. Because individuals are not required to live at the treatment center, they are able to continue with their normal daily routines and responsibilities, such as work and school. This can make outpatient treatment a more practical option for those who cannot take an extended leave of absence from their lives.


residential inpatient treatment
Source: LA Valley Recovery

Outpatient treatment is also less costly than residential inpatient treatment, as individuals are not required to pay for housing and meals while in the program. However, it is important to note that the intensity of outpatient treatment can vary greatly, and those who require a higher level of support may find that treatment costs are similar to residential inpatient treatment.


Partial hospitalization is another form of rehab similar to outpatient treatment in that it does not require individuals to live at the treatment center. However, it is generally more intensive than outpatient treatment, with individuals coming to the treatment center for several hours per day, several days per week. Partial hospitalization is often recommended for individuals who need more support than outpatient treatment can provide, but who are not in need of the round-the-clock care that residential inpatient care offers.


Summing It Up


You can see the differences between the above-mentioned forms of treatment and how one of them may fit your unique situation. If you or a loved one is suffering from the disease of addiction and is considering getting help at a residential inpatient treatment facility, look no further than LA Valley Recovery.


We have a beautiful 6-bed facility in North Hollywood, California. With 24/7 staffing, a private chef for all meals, and a luxurious living area. Contact us today for more information regarding our residential inpatient program.


bottom of page